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Officers given one per cent pay rise

Police officers have been awarded a one per cent pay rise.

But the decision has been met with anger and disappointment by the Police Federation of England and Wales which had submitted detailed evidence to support its claim for a 2.8 per cent pay rise.

The Police Remuneration Review Body (PRRB) announced yesterday that it had rejected this element of the Police Federation submission.

"I think police officers will see this as a complete and utter insult, " says Tiff Lynch, chairman of Leicestershire Police Federation, "The police play a unique role in society, putting their lives on the line to serve their communities. This derisory pay deal will only fuel the low morale within the service."

The PRRB decided, in line with the Federation's evidence, that the pay increase should be consolidated, dismissing chief officers' views that it should be non-consolidated, which would have meant the increase would not have been pensionable.

It also agreed public holiday pay should not be reduced and away from home overnight allowance should be retained.

Steve White, national chairman of the Police Federation of England and Wales, said: "The PRRB clearly hasn't listened to the reasons why we called for a 2.8 per cent increase on pay, however, it agrees with us on almost every other point we put forward.

"The Home Office and Treasury acknowledge that the UK economy grew by 2.9 per cent in 2014, yet the Government still expects hard-working police officers to further tighten their belts. This will further impact on the low morale among police officers who have told us and the PRRB that they already feel over worked, undervalued and unappreciated.

"The Government talks of austerity measures, but this clearly applies to some more than others. The bitter irony won't be lost on officers that all public sector pay review bodies have had their hands effectively tied to fit the Government's fiscal agenda and rhetoric of cuts, while MPs themselves enjoyed a pay increase of 10 per cent."

He said police officers perform a vital, extraordinary and unique function in society, explaining: "We run towards danger and threats when others can walk away; we are the emergency service of last resort that people come to when they have nowhere else and no-one else to turn to. Therefore, a one per cent pay increase will feel like a kick in the teeth for the 122,000 dedicated, professional and committed police officers who put the lives and welfare of those we serve ahead of their own."